donderdag 7 december 2017

COUR: Belgian Fin de Siècle 1880-1914 [extended deadline]

'Summer Course for the Study of the Arts in Flanders: Belgian Fin de Siècle 1880-1914' Coordinated by the Museum of Fine Arts in Ghent, the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Mu.ZEE Ostend and the Flemish Art Collection
June 24 - July 4, 2018


In the summer of 2018, several Flemish research centres, universities and art museums will collaboratively organise the fourth edition of the Summer Course for the Study of the Arts in Flanders. This edition zooms in on Belgian Fin de Siècle Art between 1880 and 1914. The target group are master and PhD-students in (art)history from all over the world.

The aim of the summer course is to bring to Flanders, annually, a select group of 20 national and international, highly qualified young researchers and to present them with an intensive 11-day programme of lectures, discussions, and on-site visits. The theme varies annually, with a focus on a different art-historical period each year. The aim is to provide the participants with a clear insight into the Flemish art collections from the period at hand, as well as into the available and most suited research methods, the state of the research and the research needs. After the course, the candidates will be ambassadors for the Flemish arts abroad.

The fourth edition of the summer course is titled Belgian Fin de Siècle 1880-1914 and will take place from June 24 through July 4, 2018. Its content is coordinated by the Museum of Fine Arts Ghent, the Royal Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp, Mu.ZEE Ostend and the Flemish Art Collection. This edition includes excursions to Ghent, Bruges, Ostend, Brussels, Paris, Namur and Antwerp. The language of the Summer Course is English. Some lectures may be in French.

The deadline has been extended. You may apply now through January 7, 2018 [extended deadline].

For practical information as well as the application procedure, please refer to
the course website.

woensdag 8 november 2017

CONF: Studiedag XIX - 8 December 2017

Interuniversitaire en -museale studiedag
Georganiseerd door XIX Werkgroep negentiende-eeuwse kunst
Koninklijke Musea voor Kunst en Geschiedenis (KMKG), Jubelpark, Brussel
8 december 2017

Op vrijdag 8 december 2017 organiseert XIX een interuniversitaire en -museale studiedag. Deze gaat door in de Koninklijke Musea voor Kunst en Geschiedenis in het Jubelpark te Brussel, vanaf 9u30.

Het voormiddagprogramma voorziet vijf prikkelende lezingen door Herwig Todts & Siska Beele (KMSKA), Davy Depelchin (Open Universiteit), Johan De Smet & Cathérine Verleysen (MSK Gent), David Vergauwen (Amarant Gent & Free: Interdisciplinaire Onderzoeksgroep Vrijmetselarij VUB) en Laurens Dhaenens (KUL). Na een vrije lunch leidt curator Werner Adriaenssens ons door de Wolferswinkel, de nieuwe zaal van de KMKG met het door Victor Horta in 1912 ontworpen interieur van de boetiek Wolfers Frères. Er worden topstukken van de art-nouveau- en art-decocollectie geëxposeerd, waarvan velen nooit eerder aan het publiek zijn getoond.

Inschrijven kan tot en met 23 november via werkgroepXIX@gmail.com, mits overschrijving van 15 EUR voor de gehele dag (3 EUR voor alleen de voormiddag en 12 EUR voor alleen de namiddag). Gelieve er rekening mee te houden dat de plaatsen beperkt zijn.

Voor het rekeningnummer en andere praktische info verwijzen we u graag naar het volledige programma hieronder.

Wij hopen leden en sympathisanten talrijk te verwelkomen.


woensdag 4 oktober 2017

COUR: Belgian Fin de Siècle 1880-1914

'Summer Course for the Study of the Arts in Flanders: Belgian Fin de Siècle 1880-1914'
Coordinated by the Museum of Fine Arts in Ghent, the Royal Museum of Fine Arts in Antwerp, Mu.ZEE Ostend and the Flemish Art Collection

June 24 - July 4, 2018

In the summer of 2018, several Flemish research centres, universities and art museums will collaboratively organise the fourth edition of the Summer Course for the Study of the Arts in Flanders. This edition zooms in on Belgian Fin de Siècle Art between 1880 and 1914. The target group are master and PhD-students in (art)history from all over the world.

The aim of the summer course is to bring to Flanders, annually, a select group of 20 national and international, highly qualified young researchers and to present them with an intensive 11-day programme of lectures, discussions, and on-site visits. The theme varies annually, with a focus on a different art-historical period each year. The aim is to provide the participants with a clear insight into the Flemish art collections from the period at hand, as well as into the available and most suited research methods, the state of the research and the research needs. After the course, the candidates will be ambassadors for the Flemish arts abroad.

The fourth edition of the summer course is titled Belgian Fin de Siècle 1880-1914 and will take place from June 24 through July 4, 2018. Its content is coordinated by the Museum of Fine Arts Ghent, the Royal Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp, Mu.ZEE Ostend and the Flemish Art Collection. This edition includes excursions to Ghent, Bruges, Ostend, Brussels, Paris, Namur and Antwerp. The language of the Summer Course is English. Some lectures may be in French.

You may apply now through December 1, 2017.

For practical information as well as the application procedure, please refer to the course website.

maandag 25 september 2017

REMINDER: CFP: Male Bonds in Nineteenth-Century Art

'Male Bonds in Nineteenth-Century Art'
Organized by Ghent University and the European Society for Nineteenth-Century Art (ESNA), in cooperation with the University of Antwerp and the Museum of Fine Arts, Ghent
Museum of Fine Arts, Ghent, Belgium
15-16 May 2018
Submission deadline: 15 October 2017

Male Bonds is a two-day international conference that aims to explore the place of male bonds in nineteenth-century artistic practice and visual arts. Male homosociality - i.e. social relationships between men - helped structure nineteenth-century European and American society. However, over the course of the century, change was instigated by the increasingly rigorous conception of same-sex sexualities and by other challenges to traditional notions of manhood. The conference strives to probe, challenge and expand upon the academic narrative of male homosociality through the lens of art history. It is to establish a multifaceted survey of the male bonds that underpinned nineteenth-century art, and to consider the theoretical and methodological implications of the study thereof. In so doing, it seeks to build a bridge between traditional art-historical scholarship and the fields of gender and gay and lesbian studies: an interdisciplinary exchange of which the full potential for scholarship on the nineteenth century remains to be exploited.

Please refer to the conference website for more information, including the full call for papers.

vrijdag 8 september 2017

CFP: European Revivals Conference 2017: Cultural Mythologies around 1900

'European Revivals Conference 2017: Cultural Mythologies around 1900'
A partnership between: University of Edinburgh, University of Helsinki, National Galleries of Scotland and Ateneum Art Museum, Finnish National Gallery, Helsinki
1-2 December 2017 at Hawthornden Lecture Theatre, Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh

Towards the end of the nineteenth century, European artists began to express a new and profound interest in their unique local pasts and cultural inheritances. This was a discourse that was largely shaped by the desire within several countries for cultural and artistic, and ultimately social and economic, independence. Historical scholarship on the subject has been broadly established in many European countries, but research has been dominated by nationalist perspectives that have emphasised the cultural specificity of each country. The European Revivals research project (initiated by the Finnish National Gallery in 2009) aims to stimulate debate on a wider scale. From this perspective, late nineteenth-century cultural revivals appear as a set of complex and interconnected phenomena that are transnational, inherently modern, and with far-reaching consequences.

The topic of the 2017 conference is Cultural Mythologies around 1900. Its aim is to examine issues such as authenticity, ‘rewriting’ and reinterpretation in relation to the production and assimilation of national styles, symbols and cultural narratives in late nineteenth century European art and literature. The conference will draw attention to the constructed and imaginary nature of national identities and the role of various mythical traditions and ‘reinventions’ within this context. Papers are invited that examine this European-wide phenomenon in relation to one of the following three themes:

Reinvention and ‘authenticity’
In the late nineteenth century Europe artists and designers frequently drew inspiration from mythical history, legend and vernacular traditions; they were also inspired by the forms and mysterious symbols of ancient ‘national’ art or recent archaeological ‘finds’. As artists adapted the narratives and symbols of the past to their own aesthetic, political or nationalist agendas, the original meaning was often lost and the concept of authenticity and originality became a key issue. This session takes a critical perspective on the topic, examining the reinvention and reconstruction of our mythical past.

Rewriting and reinterpretation

This session examines the impact of the national revival through the translation and rewriting of ancient myths and legends. The nineteenth-century saw the revival of ancient sagas such as the Poetry of Ossian, the Kalevala, or the mythical and heroic narratives of the Poetic Edda, while gifted female scholars such as Lady Guest and Lady Augusta Gregory translated the Welsh and Irish legends. This session examines the way in which the myths and legends of the past were rewritten and reinterpreted by European writers and artists, often guided by different national, political and ideological agendas.

Spiritualism and secret societies
Spiritualism and esoteric traditions had a significant place in the European cultural arena around the year 1900. This subject has become an increasingly central topic of research in recent years, but its relationship with national revivals has not been fully examined. Yet, it is well known that these two phenomena were often deeply interconnected. For instance, Celtic mysticism had direct links with spiritualism, theosophy and other occult movements, as did the mystical interpretations of the Kalevala that were popular among Finnish artists, writers, and musicians.

Please send a 500-word abstract to Marja Lahelma (marja.lahelma@helsinki.fi) and Frances Fowle (frances.fowle@ed.ac.uk or ffowle@nationalgalleries.org) by 15 September 2017.